Dementia INFO CENTER

Patients Can Take Steps to Slow Mental Decline

A foggy memory and slower thinking don't have to be a part of aging. Patients can take many steps to keep their minds sharp.

Better Sleep for a Stronger Mind

A good night’s rest may not only make you less groggy — it could also prevent a more serious brain drain. Those who get enough deep sleep may be less likely to develop dementia.

Without Proper Control, Diabetes May Lead to Mental Decline

In middle age, taking care of yourself now could mean avoiding a health crisis later — and that may go double for diabetes patients. Middle-aged diabetes patients may have a raised risk for mental decline later in life.

Coffee Buzz May Keep Minds Sharp

Reducing your risk for Alzheimer’s may be as simple as enjoying a few cups of coffee each day.

Many Dementia Patients Were Never Screened

Getting early treatment for dementia can improve patients' health. Many people, however, aren't getting screened for the disorder in the first place.

Treatment for Irregular Heartbeat May Raise Dementia Risk

For people with irregular heartbeats, the anti-clotting medication warfarin can prevent strokes. But, combined with other medications over a long period of time, it may cause other health problems.

Vitamin B Did Not Improve Thinking or Memory

Mental games can help keep brains sharp, but warding off dementia that can occur in old age may take more than that. New research examined whether a vitamin supplement could help.

Brain Trauma May Raise Dementia Risk

Researchers have long debated whether a single brain injury can raise a patient's risk for dementia. And new research suggests that it might.

High Blood Pressure May Prompt Mental Decline

High blood pressure affects 1 in 3 US adults and is tied to an increased risk of stroke, heart attack and other serious conditions, reports the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). But high blood pressure in midlife may also forecast mental decline later.

Stress and Personality May Predict Dementia in Women

A moody and high-stress lifestyle in midlife, particularly coupled with prolonged periods of distress, might do more than affect how a woman feels day-to-day. It could also play a part in the development Alzheimer's disease.